Happy International Women’s Day!

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Happy International Women’s Day to ALL women ❤❤❤

Methodist Church Votes to Maintain Opposition to LGBTQ

In St. Louis this week, 53% of Methodist delegates voted to continue the “traditional model,” which opposes same-sex marriage and LGBT clergy, leaving some LGBTQ members and clergy excluded and heartbroken.

WaPo coverage at Twitter link below, and here: UMC Vote.

If you would like to make an appointment for pastoral counseling with our newest colleague, LGBT-supportive Methodist pastoral counselor, Rev. Dr. John G. Smith, please contact us by email or phone.

 

 

New York Passes Landmark LGBTQ Equality Legislation

New York State Bans Dangerous Conversion “Therapy,” Protects Gender Expression in legislation passed today:

Pennsylvania is NOT among the states to have passed a statewide ban on conversion “therapy.” Only 18% of our population is estimated to be protected by local bans in our state. Check out the maps on this site for more information:

 

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Supporting Vulnerable Friends and Acquaintances During Violent News Cycles

Above, Header Photo: Ryan Loew/PublicSource

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Above Photo: Cox Media/WFTV9

Violence is committed every day, but people in marginalized groups experience violence at considerably higher rates than majority group members, and more often simply because of who they are. For minority group members, this can lead to a pervasive (and frankly, realistic) sense of vulnerability that causes increased symptoms of anxiety, depression, and PTSD, especially when hate-based violence is a news event.

Jeffrey Marsh has some gentle suggestions for being supportive:

Checking in and validating–without pressuring someone to talk or to help you to process–can be helpful, especially if you are willing to simply allow your friend or loved one to have the space to manage their feelings.

Publicly speaking out to or among other majority group members can also be helpful: for example, share a supportive post. But consider sharing a post that does NOT include graphic images or footage of violence. People who live with the threat of violence daily don’t need further exposure and may feel even more vulnerable.

It is common for PTSD symptoms to spike during times of social upheaval, especially for those who are in marginalized groups or who have abuse histories.

Nicole Sanchez, a lecturer at UC UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, has some useful insights about how we can support marginalized friends and coworkers during critical events. She’s talking about race, but much of the dynamics also apply to events affecting LGBTQ folks (and other marginalized groups).

 

(Threadreader compiled version here.)

 

Let people know they are loved and valued and that you want them to be safe, happy, and thriving! ❤

Instead of “Privilege,” Think of Game Settings

The classic John Scalzi discussion of how the emotionally difficult term “privilege” can be explained with a gaming metaphor. All models may be wrong, as they say, but some models are useful. And this model has held up as very, very useful:

Legal Recognition for Rights of Intersex People

As many as 1.7% of babies are born with intersex characteristics. Surgery performed on intersex children has often been medically and psychologically unnecessary, and aimed primarily at soothing parents’ worries about their child’s normalcy. This has led to lifelong traumatic outcomes in some cases.

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Above, protestors supporting rights of intersex people in medical decision-making. Photo: Kat Jercich, Rewire.News

Today the California Senate passed the first-ever legislation (resolution SCR-110) acknowledging intersex rights. Read Amy Littlefield’s article (link below):

 

Supporting Coworkers and Employees During Social Crises

 

It is common for PTSD symptoms to spike during times of social upheaval, especially for those who are in marginalized groups or who have abuse histories.

Nicole Sanchez, a lecturer at UC UC Berkeley Haas School of Business, has some useful insights about how we can support marginalized friends and coworkers during critical events. She’s talking about race, but much of the dynamics also apply to events affecting LGBTQ folks (and other marginalized groups).

 

 

(Threadreader compiled version here.)

Specialties

∙ Practice Focus & Specialties:
∙ Adults and young adults
∙ College issues
∙ Intersectional & multicultural concerns (prejudice & discrimination)
∙ LGBTQ/NB concerns
∙ Race / gender issues
∙ Expectant / new mothers
∙ International culture issues
∙ Family of origin issues
∙ Adult disordered eating
∙ Fitness / body image
∙ Depression and dysthymia
∙ Anxiety / panic
∙ Bipolar disorder
∙ Trauma history / PTSD / dissociation
∙ Insomnia
∙ Chronic illness