Therapeutic Art 12/13 and 1/10: Register Soon!

Single-Session three-hour therapeutic art groups for adults, each focused on a specific theme:

Thursday, December 13, 5-7pm: Art Therapy for Anxiety

~Appropriate for adults with OCD, Panic, Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, or other anxiety disorders.
~Online Signup via Eventbrite (or contact us directly) REGISTRATION EXTENDED THROUGH 12/5

Thursday, January 10, 5-7:30pm: Art Therapy for Trauma History 

~Appropriate for adults with PTSD or related issues deriving from experiences of violence or abusive/chaotic/violent environment
~Online Signup via Eventbrite (or contact us directly) REGISTER THROUGH 12/30


 

~All supplies provided

~You may sign up for one or both groups, depending on availability of spaces

~Many insurances will reimburse – please ask for a receipt

~If you are not a current client at Intersectional Life C&P, a referral from your current therapist is required ~OR~ if you don’t have a therapist you may request a brief screening interview (phone or in-person, 1/2 hour)

 

 

 

Upcoming Therapeutic Art Groups: Trauma and Anxiety

Single-Session three-hour therapeutic art groups for adults, each focused on a specific theme:

Thursday, November 29, 5-8pm: Art Therapy for Trauma History

~Appropriate for adults with PTSD or related issues deriving from experiences of violence or abusive/chaotic/violent environment

Thursday, December 13, 5-8pm: Art Therapy for Anxiety

~Appropriate for adults with OCD, Panic, Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, or other anxiety disorders.


 

~All supplies provided

~You may sign up for one or both groups, depending on availability of spaces

~Cost per group (3-hr session) is $155. (Many insurances will reimburse – please ask for a receipt)

~If you are not a current client at Intersectional Life C&P, a referral from your current therapist is required ~OR~ if you don’t have a therapist you may request a brief screening interview (phone or in-person, 1/2 hour)

Please contact us soon to register.

 

Dare to Dream

Dare to Dream…by Stacey Murrell

When I was a little girl I did not have the luxury of dreaming. Life required my constant attention if my family and I were to survive. It wasn’t until I went to junior high school and began to take field trips outside of my community that I dreamt of becoming a News Anchor. I could envision myself on television sitting behind the desk and delivering powerful stories that would change people’s lives. They would see me as a compassionate change agent that would “get it done”. They would feel so connected that they would want to reach into the television and give me a hug, knowing I would return the love.

Today as a woman, I AM…a compassionate change agent who gets it done! I am a survivor. I am a nurse. I am a speaker. I am a teacher. I am a writer. I am an encourager.  I am a professional. I am an overcomer with scars both physical and emotional that prove I have survived. I am things that I don’t even know that I am because I choose to believe that I am everything that God says I am.

It’s hard at times to always look upward. The very life can get sucked out of you. I have learned that I do not want the attention of a worldwide news anchor but rather the satisfaction of knowing that through speaking, writing, encouraging and developing others, I am indeed sitting at the desk of my own life with God as my audience of one. If He is pleased than my work, whatever it is, is good!

Take 10 seconds and close your eyes. Envision where you want to be. Take a mental snapshot and frame it on your heart. There is always hope!

 

You can reach Stacey at MasterThePieces@gmail.com or (716) MASTR-PC [716-627-772]

Specialties

∙ Practice Focus & Specialties:
∙ Adults and young adults
∙ College issues
∙ Intersectional & multicultural concerns (prejudice & discrimination)
∙ LGBTQ/NB concerns
∙ Race / gender issues
∙ Expectant / new mothers
∙ International culture issues
∙ Family of origin issues
∙ Adult disordered eating
∙ Fitness / body image
∙ Depression and dysthymia
∙ Anxiety / panic
∙ Bipolar disorder
∙ Trauma history / PTSD / dissociation
∙ Insomnia
∙ Chronic illness

What To Do Until Your Therapy Appointment

Even when there is not an emergency situation, it can be hard to cope with crisis or distress while you are waiting for your appointment in a few days or weeks. But taking care of yourself as best you can until then will help a great deal.

Talk to friends / family members: Share your feelings and thoughts with someone you feel comfortable with and who cares for you.

Take a bath / shower: Taking a bath or shower can calm you down and soothe you.

Exercise / take a walk: Go outside or go to the gym to exercise and release the tension.

Write: Take some time to write about how you feel and how you make sense of things.

Practice relaxation techniques: Listen to a relaxation track on YouTube or similar, and follow the directions.

Eat healthfully: It is important to take care of your basic needs. Fueling your body with healthy food is one of them.

Practice meditation: There are many different kinds of meditation. One of the ways to practice meditation is to be still and observe the sensations in your body from head to toe. If troublesome thoughts come into your mind, be aware of them but let them go. Try the free guided sessions at Headspace if a structured approach works for you.

Breathe deeply: You can practice deep breathing in any setting. Try to inhale deep into your abdomen.

Get enough sleep: If you are tired you will not be able to think clearly. Sleeping 7-8 hours per night can rejuvenate you and help you think clearly. Practice meditation or take a bath to help with difficulties falling asleep.

Attend to your spiritual needs: During hard times, attending to your spiritual needs by attending or observing services, meeting with others, or praying may help to comfort you.

Set several small goals for the day and work on them: Focusing on one thing at a time will help keep you from feeling overwhelmed.

Structure your time: Re-evaluate your priorities. Time management isn’t just about “how much can I squeeze in” but rather “what can I let go of.” Include things that are meaningful and comforting for you, not just a bunch of obligations.

Accept help: When loved ones offer help, try accepting some instead of expecting to do everything on your own. Also, remind the anxious part of yourself that you are no longer helpless and you will take care of yourself.

 

– Dr. Liz

  • (Adapted from materials used at Michigan State University Counseling Center)
  • For additional practical self-care measures, try this helpful list!