Bedtime Panic Attacks

It’s pretty common for people going through stressful periods to have panic attacks just as they fall asleep or even during sleep, after having managed anxiety successfully during the day. This is because our psychological defenses and coping strategies drop away as we fall asleep, leaving anxiety symptoms free to rise. This can result in anxiety dreams or even panic that wakes you up.

While there is no way to “erase” anxiety, allowing yourself to experience the anxiety in a safe, mindful way during waking hours can help to minimize bedtime panic attacks and allow you to sleep better.

Specifically: allowing yourself to feel the anxiety until it passes, while–for example–talking to a trusted friend or your therapist, journaling, or just crying, can be a relief.

Moderate cardio exercise can also help in that it uses up excess cortisol, which triggers panic attacks. (However, don’t exercise right before bedtime as that may wake up your system and lead to insomnia.)

You Are Not “Lazy”

“I’m not getting enough done, I’m so lazy.” “I ended up hardly doing anything Sunday and I felt so lazy.” “I need to get this one task done, but I keep being lazy about it.” “After work I’m just too lazy to work out.” “I’m too lazy to keep track of things.”

In fact, I have never met a lazy person.

I’ve met people who are: overworked, exhausted, sleep-deprived, in chronic pain, ill, mired in depressive episodes, struggling with anxiety, stuck in intolerable situations, and having attention difficulties, but I’ve never met a lazy person.

“Lazy” doesn’t really mean anything clinically. It’s a “folk” term, and it is primarily used as a pejorative towards self or others. One patient summed it up as “not doing what you think you ‘should‘,” and I think that’s a good all-around summation.

Calling yourself “lazy” is usually an internalized message from caregivers in your formative years. It could have been directed towards you or towards others. The message is “You are unacceptable unless you do what I want, regardless of your ability, wishes, or how you are feeling.”

If you are injured, walk it off! If you are tired, too bad! If you are sick, it can’t be that bad since you’re not actually in an ambulance on the way to the hospital! Just because you don’t want to do something is no reason not to do it! You’re just “lazy”! In other words, how you feel and what you want do not matter. Ignore your own feelings and your wishes.

“Lazy” has also been used (and still is) as a way to demean racial minorities, those with disabilities, the poor, and women. Please be especially careful not to re-enact racism, ableism, classism, and sexism on yourself by calling yourself lazy!

The implication is that if you would just “will” yourself to do whatever it is, then you would be acceptable and worthy. If not, then you must just be a bad, unworthy person and you must deserve bad treatment.

The fact is, you are already acceptable and worthy, without doing anything to “earn” that worth. Now, you might feel better or happier if you were doing certain things, and they are certainly worth trying, to see if that is the case. But telling yourself you are “lazy” is not helpful.

Feeling awful about yourself is not a good motivator for anyone. And it is in no way helpful in mitigating situational factors, such as poverty or prejudice. In fact, it is likely to worsen your exhaustion, depression, anxiety, insomnia, and concentration, which will make it even harder to do whatever it is you would like to be doing.

Instead of calling yourself lazy when you did not do something you intended to, try paying attention to your feelings. Are you tired? Has it been weeks since you had a good night’s sleep? Have you been working 60 hours at three different jobs? Do you have an infant or a toddler? Are you taking care of others’ needs? Are you sick? Are you getting sick? Are you going through an exhausting life transition? Are you grieving? Are you experiencing chronic pain or illness? Are you in a depressive episode? Are you experiencing anxiety/phobia about certain tasks? Do you have PTSD? Are there systemic barriers to your tasks that make them much harder than they are for others? Have you been paying attention to self-care?

It may be that you have internalized some unrealistic expectations for what you “should” be able to do. It may be that some others can do the thing you want to do. It may be that on “good” days you have been able to do twenty times as much as you are doing today. But where are you, just you, today, right here, right now? Maybe you’re doing the best you can with what you have at your disposal right now. Maybe that is enough.

Another day, you may be able to do something more or something different. But accepting yourself right now is even more important than doing the thing. And that does not make anyone “lazy.”

 

Specialties

∙ Practice Focus & Specialties:
∙ Adults and young adults
∙ College issues
∙ Intersectional & multicultural concerns (prejudice & discrimination)
∙ LGBTQ/NB concerns
∙ Race / gender issues
∙ Expectant / new mothers
∙ International culture issues
∙ Family of origin issues
∙ Adult disordered eating
∙ Fitness / body image
∙ Depression and dysthymia
∙ Anxiety / panic
∙ Bipolar disorder
∙ Trauma history / PTSD / dissociation
∙ Insomnia
∙ Chronic illness