2019: United Nations’ International Year of Indigenous Languages

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Emma Stevens, a high school student in Eskasoni, Cape Breton, sings a gorgeous rendition of classic McCartney track in her native language, Mi’kmaq, as part of an effort to bring awareness to the United Nations International Year of Indigenous Languages.

 

(Full Mi’kmaq lyrics on YouTube page)

 

“Wherever you live, indigenous peoples are your neighbors”

To hear more about why it’s important to keep indigenous languages alive, see the video below:

Indigenous people of southeast Pennsylvania:

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One expression of genocide is destroying the language of a culture. Maintaining and reviving language is an important aspect of resisting cultural destruction and genocide!

 

 

Notre Dame Fire: Sic Transit Gloria Mundi

Header photo via Westcoaster

Millions around the world grieve a significant piece of European and world history:

As civilizations have experienced throughout the history of humanity:

 

When there is a loss grieved by so many at once, we may feel very connected to others or very isolated. Both are normal. You may have never been to the Cathedral, but it’s part of our communal knowledge and experience.

It can also feel strange and even dissociative to witness historic events–especially painful ones–as though we are observing history passing instead of being “inside” it, as usual. A significant historic event can bring up issues of mortality, death, and existential issues.

Make sure to take care of your physical body and to connect with others in a positive, everyday way as best you can when catastrophic events occur. Eat a meal with someone, stop for a drink, talk on the phone, stop at someone’s house to say “hi,” hold someone’s hand, go to a service, hug your children.

Immigrant Families Managing Depression, Anxiety

Because of the many layers of stresses and even traumas associated with immigration, immigrants and their families may face high levels of mental distress. This includes things such as traumatic events that were severe enough to make them leave their home country in the first place, as well as the great difficulties in adjusting to a new and sometimes hostile environment.

In some cases, cultural conflict and cultural differences may make dealing with mental health issues even more difficult.  But some members of immigrant groups are working to alleviate this and support mental health of fellow members, such as  Ryan Tanep, in this piece by Malaka Gharibh:

 

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