Immigrant Families Managing Depression, Anxiety

Because of the many layers of stresses and even traumas associated with immigration, immigrants and their families may face high levels of mental distress. This includes things such as traumatic events that were severe enough to make them leave their home country in the first place, as well as the great difficulties in adjusting to a new and sometimes hostile environment.

In some cases, cultural conflict and cultural differences may make dealing with mental health issues even more difficult.  But some members of immigrant groups are working to alleviate this and support mental health of fellow members, such as  Ryan Tanep, in this piece by Malaka Gharibh:

 

Indigenous Peoples Day 2018

It really doesn’t take much to show a kinder spirit and truly make the lives of others less painful:

Some reflections and ideas from the Unitarian Universalist Association here: Indigenous Peoples Day

Teen Vogue discusses the history of the movement to change the name of the holiday: Indigenous Peoples Day: 4 Things to Know

Reading list for grownups

Reading list for children:

 

Simple action to help:

Specialties

∙ Practice Focus & Specialties:
∙ Adults and young adults
∙ College issues
∙ Intersectional & multicultural concerns (prejudice & discrimination)
∙ LGBTQ/NB concerns
∙ Race / gender issues
∙ Expectant / new mothers
∙ International culture issues
∙ Family of origin issues
∙ Adult disordered eating
∙ Fitness / body image
∙ Depression and dysthymia
∙ Anxiety / panic
∙ Bipolar disorder
∙ Trauma history / PTSD / dissociation
∙ Insomnia
∙ Chronic illness