Dare to Dream

Dare to Dream…by Stacey Murrell

When I was a little girl I did not have the luxury of dreaming. Life required my constant attention if my family and I were to survive. It wasn‚Äôt until I went to junior high school and began to take field trips outside of my community that I dreamt of becoming a News Anchor. I could envision myself on television sitting behind the desk and delivering powerful stories that would change people’s lives. They would see me as a compassionate change agent that would ‚Äúget it done‚ÄĚ. They would¬†feel so connected that they would want¬†to¬†reach into the television and give me a hug, knowing I would return the love.

Today as a woman, I AM…a compassionate change agent who gets it done! I am a survivor. I am a nurse. I am a speaker. I am a teacher. I am a writer. I am an encourager.¬† I am a professional. I am an overcomer with scars both physical and emotional that prove I have survived. I am things that I don‚Äôt even know that I am because I choose to believe that I am everything that God says I am.

It’s hard at times to always look upward. The very life can get sucked out of you. I have learned that I do not want the attention of a worldwide news anchor but rather the satisfaction of knowing that through speaking, writing, encouraging and developing others, I am indeed sitting at the desk of my own life with God as my audience of one. If He is pleased than my work, whatever it is, is good!

Take 10 seconds and close your eyes. Envision where you want to be. Take a mental snapshot and frame it on your heart. There is always hope!

 

You can reach Stacey at MasterThePieces@gmail.com or (716) MASTR-PC [716-627-772]

Master the Pieces with Simple “WINS”

I first had the pleasure of meeting Stacey Murrell at the Lancaster Marriott’s Penn Square Grille one evening last spring when she was in Lancaster implementing a diversity training for a group at Lancaster General Hospital. I am sure that her frank, friendly, and erudite openness was an asset to their participants! Below, she has some inspirational words for managing everyday life:

— Dr. Liz


 

When artisans young and old begin to create a work of art,¬†it usually isn’t until years later that the original work is seen by others as a¬†Masterpiece. I suggest that we think of our lives in that same manner. Everyday each of us are immersed in a sea of movement and emotions. We are constantly on the go even when we are being till. Our minds, racing to¬†the next thing in hopes of¬†keeping all the¬†balls in the air. Why are we surprised when they fall and most of us do not have the¬†talent of juggling? LOL

The constant movement can cause overload’s that manifest as¬†fear, anxiety and compulsive behaviors and we end up overlooking the very things that gave us the energy to perform at this capacity.

To regulate¬†the nuances of life, it’s important to¬†incorporate routines that will allow you to release the pressure. The following are simple “wins” that are meant to be stepping stones that will propel you forward in Mastering the Pieces until you become the Masterpiece you were destined to be…

1.) Meditate 5 minutes in the morning and night

2.) Take a walk for 10 minutes away from your work area/home

3.) Give thanks by telling someone you appreciate them

4.) Write down one simple “win” everyday¬†in a journal near where you rest

5.) Look in the mirror first thing in the morning and say, “I’m good enough!”

 

StM_Image

 

You can reach Stacey at MasterThePieces@gmail.com or (716) MASTR-PC [716-627-772]

 

Depression Part 3: Nurture Yourself Back to Life

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3: Physical Aspects–Sleep and Nutrition

It can be very hard to take care of yourself even at the best of times, especially if you have a trauma history. And when you’re depressed, it can be even harder to take care of yourself. You might feel too drained, sad, and even unworthy of care. But this is exactly when it is most important to take care of yourself, even if you can only do a little bit.

Just do the little bit that you can. And keep doing it.

First, stabilize your physical aspect as best you can. The four most crucial mental health needs of your body are sleep, nutrition, exercise, and social interaction. You may also be considering medication.

Sleep: regular sleep is probably the single most important thing your body needs to maintain mental health. If you have been skimping on sleep in order to get things done, you may need to let a lot more tasks go in order to recover. The purpose of sleep is to release toxins from your brain cells. If you are not getting enough sleep, then you are intoxicated, and not in a fun way–your brain is poisoned. Start developing a sleep routine that is as regular as you can make it, close to the same time every night.

If you are struggling with insomnia, the insomnia needs to be addressed so you can get the sleep you need. It’s not uncommon for depression or anxiety to remit simply by getting your sleep stabilized. Don’t use alcohol as a sleep aid: alcohol is not only a depressant, but it also interferes with sleep cycles, so it can worsen sleep problems.

If depression is causing you to sleep too much, it may be most useful to first address other physical aspects of depression before trying to cut down on sleep. Besides, is it actually “too much”? You may need extra sleep for the time being. If it feels like you are convalescing from an illness, that is because you are.

Nutrition: Your body needs fuel in order to operate physically and mentally. Your mood will be worsened by hunger, even if you are not feeling the hunger. At least get a bit of  protein and some complex carbohydrates. If your appetite has dropped and you are having trouble eating, or caring about eating, then try having something like Ensure, or chocolate milk, or kefir on hand Рit can be easier to drink something. If you can eat a little something a few times a day, even if not your usual meals, it will help you not to sink further into depression.

When you’re feeling up to it, treat yourself nicely when you eat. It can be comforting. It may be you’re just eating condensed soup sitting on the couch, but see if you can eat it from your favorite bowl. Or try eating something that reminds you of childhood in a pleasant way.

When you have regained enough energy to attend better to your meals, you can get back to what you would normally eat, but for now it’s okay to just eat something.

If you are suddenly eating a lot more than you normally would, try to be gentle with yourself. There is a reason you are doing this–you feel bad!–and it’s not worth harshly criticizing yourself. Indeed, you will make yourself feel worse and it might compound the issue. Remember the important thing is to fuel yourself and restore your balance overall, and do so gently. The goal is not to sternly restrict. That may backfire.

 

Next: Physical Aspects–Basic Exercise, Social Interaction, Medication

Have a Restful Labor Day!

Art by Ricardo Levins Morales

Remember that the original purpose of Labor Day was to promote worker solidarity and to reduce the length and number of workdays. So keep the spirit of the day and take some time to rest!

The US Department of Labor describes the first Labor Day

We often imply that only paid labor is “real work,” but in fact unpaid labor is at least as crucial to society and is usually unpaid only because of who is doing it: from the work that women do that literally holds society together but is not counted in the GDP, to the not only unpaid but also forced labor that built this country in the first place.

~Honor your own contribution as valuable, whether paid or unpaid. Know your worth.~